Hungry for a rebrand?

The biggest asian food chain in the Dominican Republic sure was.

It’s been some time since good reputation solely was the main stepping stone to a successful business, WOM did most of the heavy lifting for the brand positioning and consumers regarded tradition as a hard earned value.

We now live in the digital share-it-all world, where 100 million daily posts are uploaded on Instagram alone, of which almost 197 million of them use the popular #foodporn  hashtag (at the time this was published). Everybody craves for that perfectly styled Crème brûlée and everyone wants to try the new “it” place.

This new fast and informed consumer era means choosing between constant reinvention or death, specially for brands in the food and beverage business.

A good service begins way before the customer enters a restaurant. It’s essential to be coherent in terms of the food quality and the overall experience of the brand: all about interior design, menu imagery, the brand’s tone and personality… Inconsistency in the brand experience can suggest the same about food handling and kitchen policies.

For our client Jade Teriyaki, it meant a well past due bill on their rebranding. They were delivering quality food everyday, but the brand wasn’t appealing enough to new consumers or even regulars.

All new and up to date

We performed a complete overhaul to the business image, creating a refreshing new brand identity, now in tune with current consumers’ expectations, food quality and the competitive fast food environment. The custom made font emulates hanzi characters, while preserving high readability for the logo in its many applications.

A concrete style in place

The all-new Jade Teriyaki has a vibrant presence in every food court, keeping a strong connection to the asian culture; a balanced use of wood and concrete in the facade communicate a natural, flexible language based on ancient solid tradition.

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Colorful, iconic brand culture

Patterns and illustrations are a main functional element of the brands identity, placed on either too large or small spaces to maximize brand awareness.
We deliberately avoided the over-used red/black color combination, the most common choice in asian food aesthetics.
From standing in line deciding what to order, to holding one of the patterned cups while sipping a cold soda between bites, it’s a whole new experience to eat in any Teriyaki. It’s no longer only the oldest asian food chain in the country, it’s now a younger, fresher brand and it certainly has character.

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"Patterns and illustrations are a main functional element of the brands identity, placed on either too large or small spaces to maximize brand awareness."
Now who's hungry for good branding?